Thursday, June 20, 2013

08:15 — 12:00
Pre-conference Doctoral Workshop at University of Glasgow
12:30 — 13:45
Luncheon
13:45 — 15:00
Conference Welcome & Plenary Session I: Strategy and Coping in Complex Settings: Stories, Heuristics and Mess

Co-Chairs

Robert MacIntosh, Heriot-Watt University

photo of Robert MacIntosh

Robert MacIntosh is Head of the School of Management and Languages at Heriot-Watt University. He trained as an engineer and has researched strategy development and strategic change for twenty years in a range of public, private, family and charitable organizations. He co-chaired an SMS Special Conference in Glasgow in 2013 on the theme of strategy in complex settings. His work draws on complexity theory and dialogue and he has published extensively in top rank journals including Strategic Management Journal. He sits on the Council of the British Academy of Management, is a board member for the charity Turning Point Scotland and for Heriot-Watt University Malaysia. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the Chartered Management Institute. He has published three books in 2015: "Strategic Management: strategists at work" published by Palgrave and "Research Methods for Business and Management" (2nd Ed) and “Management in a Global Context” both published by Goodfellow. His status as a shareholder in Aberdeen Football Club demonstrates his sense of optimism.

Donald Maclean, University of Glasgow

photo of Donald Maclean

Donald MacLean received his PhD from the University of Cambridge and spent ten years working in the global optoelectronics industry before joining the University of Glasgow in 1993 where he is now a professorial research fellow. He is currently researching strategic management in complex inter-organizational settings, rules-based strategic management, and action-theory in dynamic capabilities. He has published extensively on strategy, complexity theory and research process in a range of journals including the Strategic Management Journal, The Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies and Human Relations. He has been active in SMS since 1993 presenting and reviewing, and will co-chair the special conference in Glasgow in June 2013. He has extensive experience of industry through management posts and on-going consultancy: for BT& Du Pont he ran the Advanced Products Business which commercialized the parent companies’ optoelectronic technologies, and he is currently the strategy leader for the Institute of Directors in Scotland.

Panelist

Marjorie Lyles, Indiana University

photo of Marjorie Lyles

Marjorie Lyles is OneAmerica Chair in Business Administration and Professor of International Strategic Management at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business. Marjorie Lyles’ research addresses organizational learning and innovation, international strategies, joint ventures, and alliances, particularly in emerging economies. She has over 100 articles and chapters. Her work has appeared in top academic journals such as SMJ, SEJ, ASQ, JIBS, OSci, AMR, JMS and AMJ. She is a SMS and AIB Fellow. Lyles & Salk (1996) on learning in IJVs won the JIBS Decade Award 2006. She has also received two NSF grants. She has consulted with USIA, World Bank, USAID, UNDP and private firms in Malaysia, Hungary, Vietnam, Poland, China and Indonesia on international strategies, educational projects, and needs assessment for management. Marjorie Lyles has served SMS in many roles: 2009 Program Co-Chair of the Annual Conference in Washington, D.C., Board of Trustees of the Strategic Management Foundation; Consulting Editor for Global Strategy Journal; co-founder and Chair for the Knowledge and Innovation Interest Group, and over twenty years of attending and reviewing for the Annual Conference and the Strategic Management Journal.

Ian Mitroff, University of Southern California

photo of Ian Mitroff

Ian Mitroff is an Adjunct Professor in the College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley. He is also a Senior Investigator in the Center for Catastrophic Risk Management, University of California, Berkeley. He is Professor Emeritus from the Annenberg School of Communication and the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, where he was the Harold Quinton Distinguished Professor of Business Policy. He is the President of the consulting firm Mitroff Crisis Management. He is regarded as the founder of the discipline of Crisis Management. He was the founder and director of the USC Center for Crisis Management. Known for his thinking and writing on a wide range of business and societal issues, Ian Mitroff is the author of 30 previous books, including “Swans, Swine, and Swindlers: Coping with the Growing Threat of Mega Messes and Mega Crises,” “Dirty Rotten Strategies: How We Trick Ourselves and Others into Solving the Wrong Problems Precisely,” “A Spiritual Audit of Corporate America,” “Smart Thinking for Crazy Times,” “The Essential Guide to Managing Corporate Crisis,” “The Unbounded Mind” and “Managing Crises Before They Happen.” With his wife Donna Mitroff, his latest book is, “Fables and the Art of Leadership: Bring the Wisdom of Mister Rogers to the Workplace.”

Either We Learn to Manage Complex, Messy Systems or They Will Continue to Mismanage Us:

Increasingly, all of the crucial problems of societies are parts of complex, messy systems. There are no such things as simple, isolated problems that have a separate existence and hence can be analyzed independently from all the other problems and the messes of which they are a part. A “mess” is a complex system of problems that are so highly intertwined such that no individual problem can be taken out of the mess and studied independently from all the other problems without fundamentally distorting both the nature of the particular problem and the entire mess. Unlike simple exercises, messes do not have nice, neat solutions. As a result, there are no algorithms that guarantee solutions; there are only heuristics for coping with them as best we can. One either learns to manage the problems that compose messes in concert--as parts of a complex whole--or one does not manage them at all. Further, all messes are interconnected. For example, the Financial Mess is inextricably intertwined with the Education Mess, the Crime Mess, the Housing Mess, etc. Finally, the current education system is not only a mess, but unfortunately, like most messes, it does not prepare people for coping with messes! In short, from top to bottom, the current education system is hopelessly out of touch with the nature of the world, i.e., reality. (see full session details)

15:00 — 15:30
Coffee Break
15:30 — 16:45
Parallel Paper / Common Ground/ Panel / Developmental Sessions

Track A: Strategy Processes in Complex Settings

Session 20
Strategic Planning and Choice in Complex Settings
Session 39
Capabilities and Ambidexterity

Track B: Strategy Practices in Complex Settings

Session 19
Developing Strategizing Concepts

Track C: Stakeholder Involvement in Complex Settings

Session 36
Stakeholders Management, Power and Legitimacy
17:00 — 18:15
Crossroads Session: Growth and Other Performance Objectives

Session Chair

J Ignacio Canales, University of Glasgow

photo of J Ignacio Canales

Ignacio Canales is a Reader in Strategy at the Adam Smith Business School in the University of Glasgow. His research interests in strategy process focuses on asymmetric relationships between managers as they interact to formulate and implement strategy. His research has been published in the Journal of Management Studies, British Journal of Management Long Range Planning and Advances in Strategic Management. At the PhD level he teaches a seminar in qualitative methodology, for undergraduates and MBA students offers a course on Strategic Management. Ignacio Canales served as co-chair of the SMS Special conference held in Glasgow in June 2013 as well as organiser of the PhD workshop, He has been a member of the SMS since 2003 when he received the Best PhD paper award in the SMS held in Baltimore.

Until the 2007 credit crunch the most common aspiration of any organization or any country for that matter was growth. Such growth objectives could be seen as the ultimate aspiration of any business strategy. However, given the times we live in now, growth may not always be a feasible aspiration. Then what should strategy look at as “the” performance objective or what can substitute for growth as a legitimate aspiration? Within this thought space we invite you to share ideas from you research area of expertise and bring them to the Glasgow SMS Conference. (see full session details)

19:00 — 20:00
Off-Site Welcome Cocktail Reception at City Chambers

Friday, June 21, 2013

09:00 — 10:15
Parallel Paper / Common Ground/ Panel / Developmental Sessions

Track A: Strategy Processes in Complex Settings

Session 14
Strategy Execution and Complexity

Track B: Strategy Practices in Complex Settings

Session 28
Strategizing Micro-Practices
Session 29
Concept Development in Adaptation and Complexity

Track C: Stakeholder Involvement in Complex Settings

Session 21
Stakeholder Cooperation, Conflict and Competition
10:15 — 10:45
Coffee Break
10:45 — 12:00
Plenary Session II: Dealing with Strategy in Complex Settings – Some Insights from Strategists

Co-Chairs

Robert MacIntosh, Heriot-Watt University

photo of Robert MacIntosh

Robert MacIntosh is Head of the School of Management and Languages at Heriot-Watt University. He trained as an engineer and has researched strategy development and strategic change for twenty years in a range of public, private, family and charitable organizations. He co-chaired an SMS Special Conference in Glasgow in 2013 on the theme of strategy in complex settings. His work draws on complexity theory and dialogue and he has published extensively in top rank journals including Strategic Management Journal. He sits on the Council of the British Academy of Management, is a board member for the charity Turning Point Scotland and for Heriot-Watt University Malaysia. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the Chartered Management Institute. He has published three books in 2015: "Strategic Management: strategists at work" published by Palgrave and "Research Methods for Business and Management" (2nd Ed) and “Management in a Global Context” both published by Goodfellow. His status as a shareholder in Aberdeen Football Club demonstrates his sense of optimism.

Donald Maclean, University of Glasgow

photo of Donald Maclean

Donald MacLean received his PhD from the University of Cambridge and spent ten years working in the global optoelectronics industry before joining the University of Glasgow in 1993 where he is now a professorial research fellow. He is currently researching strategic management in complex inter-organizational settings, rules-based strategic management, and action-theory in dynamic capabilities. He has published extensively on strategy, complexity theory and research process in a range of journals including the Strategic Management Journal, The Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies and Human Relations. He has been active in SMS since 1993 presenting and reviewing, and will co-chair the special conference in Glasgow in June 2013. He has extensive experience of industry through management posts and on-going consultancy: for BT& Du Pont he ran the Advanced Products Business which commercialized the parent companies’ optoelectronic technologies, and he is currently the strategy leader for the Institute of Directors in Scotland.

Panelists

Kate Buell-Armstrong, University of Glasgow

photo of Kate Buell-Armstrong

Kate Armstrong helped to found Admiral Group Plc after working on the launch of Churchill Insurance as their Systems Development Manager. This was after 10 years working as an IT consultant in Australia and the Far East for companies as diverse as Cathay Pacific, IBM, TNT, Reserve Bank of Australia and Shell. At Admiral she managed the launch of their brands Diamond and Elephant.co.uk and acted as Marketing Director until 2002 when she set up the team to launch Confused.com. She remained as ‘Confused Managing Director’ until 2006 when she retired from full-time work although continuing to provide coaching and mentoring for Admiral’s burgeoning world-wide management team. She also retained a non-executive role on the subsidiary board that oversees Confused and its European expansion and recently joined the board of the US subsidiary company. In in her spare time she is currently writing up her PhD thesis at Glasgow University.

Harry Burns, Scottish Government

photo of Harry Burns

Sir Harry Burns graduated in medicine from Glasgow University in 1974. He trained in surgery in Glasgow and developed a research interest in the metabolic consequences of illness and injury. He was appointed Honorary Consultant Surgeon and Senior Lecturer in Surgery in the University Department of Surgery at the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow in 1984. Working with patients in the east end of Glasgow gave him an insight into the complex inter-relationships between socioeconomic status and illness. He completed a Masters Degree in Public Health in 1990 and shortly afterwards was appointed Medical Director of The Royal Infirmary. In 1994, he became Director of Public Health for Greater Glasgow Health Board, a position he occupied until 2005. During his time with Greater Glasgow Health Board he continued research into the problems of social determinants of health but also worked on measurement of outcomes in a variety of clinical conditions, including cancer. In 1998, he took a part-time appointment with the Health Department in the Scottish Government and worked for 3 years as lead clinician in Scotland for cancer care. In the course of this work he developed Managed Cancer Networks and helped re-organise cancer services in Scotland. In 2005, he became Chief Medical Officer for Scotland where his responsibilities include aspects of public health policy and health protection. He also has policy responsibility for sport in Scotland.

Sandy Rowan, Pointer Security

photo of Sandy Rowan

Sandy Rowan is CEO of Pointer Ltd. He joined the business in 1991 as branch manager for its Glasgow branch. He was appointed Managing Director in 1999. Over the last 13 years Pointer has expanded into overseas markets in the Far and Middle East, grown its range of service offerings to include fire and integrated security systems as mainstream products, and developed considerable expertise in the successful delivery of complex installation projects in the UK, Oman and Thailand. Sandy Rowan graduated from Edinburgh University in 1983 with an MA in Economic History and worked for Austin Rover and Mercedes Benz UK before joining Pointer. He has been a director of the Scottish Business Crime Centre since 2006.

Kate Armstrong, Harry Burns and Sandy Rowan are senior figures in corporate, public and family organizations respectively. In this plenary, these three strategists will share their experiences of leading strategy development processes which engage a range of stakeholders both inside and beyond their organizations. Each of the panellists lead organizations facing rapidly changing environments and multiple possible interpretations of purpose. The panellists will discuss their views on the leaders role in framing and developing strategy in contexts which range from improving health, social and economic outcomes for the population of Scotland to the impacts of technology on business models and industry boundaries. This plenary represents an opportunity to link theory and practice and will feature discussion of themes such as learning, compassion and leadership from a strategist's perspective. (see full session details)

12:00 — 13:15
Luncheon
13:15 — 14:30
Parallel Paper / Common Ground/ Panel / Developmental Sessions

Track A: Strategy Processes in Complex Settings

Session 15
Strategic Issue and Complexity
Session 40
Aspirations, Governance & Control

Track B: Strategy Practices in Complex Settings

Session 27
Building and Employing Dynamic Capabilities

Track C: Stakeholder Involvement in Complex Settings

Session 35
Stakeholders, Timing, Complexity and Materiality
14:45 — 16:00
Plenary Session III: Research Process and Engaging with Practitioners in Complex Settings

Chair

Robert MacIntosh, Heriot-Watt University

photo of Robert MacIntosh

Robert MacIntosh is Head of the School of Management and Languages at Heriot-Watt University. He trained as an engineer and has researched strategy development and strategic change for twenty years in a range of public, private, family and charitable organizations. He co-chaired an SMS Special Conference in Glasgow in 2013 on the theme of strategy in complex settings. His work draws on complexity theory and dialogue and he has published extensively in top rank journals including Strategic Management Journal. He sits on the Council of the British Academy of Management, is a board member for the charity Turning Point Scotland and for Heriot-Watt University Malaysia. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the Chartered Management Institute. He has published three books in 2015: "Strategic Management: strategists at work" published by Palgrave and "Research Methods for Business and Management" (2nd Ed) and “Management in a Global Context” both published by Goodfellow. His status as a shareholder in Aberdeen Football Club demonstrates his sense of optimism.

Speaker

Jean Bartunek, Boston College

photo of Jean Bartunek

Jean Bartunek is the Robert A. and Evelyn J. Ferris Chair and Professor of Management and Organization at Boston College. Her PhD in social and organizational psychology is from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a past president and fellow of the Academy of Management, and in 2009 she won the Academy of Management’s Career Distinguished Service award. Jean Bartunek has published more than 125 journal articles and book chapters, as well as five books. She is currently an associate editor of the Academy of Management Learning and Education and the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. She co-edited a 2012 special topic forum on compassion and care in organizations in the Academy of Management Review. Her research interests focus primarily around organizational change, broadly conceived, and academic-practitioner relationships.

There are many challenges when conducting research in a complex setting, not least the realization that there may be more going on than first meets the eye. In this plenary, Professor Jean Bartunek will explore one such research project. Its beginning was straightforward enough. The principal of Lomond School in the USA contacted Dr. Sharp, a well-known Professor who had recently published a book on bilingual education. The principal needed help. Forty Portuguese speaking students, most of them newly arrived from Brazil, had enrolled in the school. More were coming. By law Lomond School had to offer a transitional bilingual education program. Could Dr. Sharp help the school implement a sophisticated and effective program? Could she help develop proper assessment tools? What a golden opportunity. The researcher was being invited by the school to implement a change project based on her own model and to develop assessment tools for it, all with publication in mind. However, process of conducting the research slowly uncovered layers and layers of complexity. The plenary will give an overview of the impact of such complexity on the research, and Professor Bartunek will discuss both the conduct and outcomes of research in the types of complex settings which practitioners often encounter. (see full session details)

16:00 — 16:30
Coffee Break
16:30 — 17:45
Parallel Paper / Common Ground/ Panel / Developmental Sessions

Track A: Strategy Processes in Complex Settings

Session 16
Processes of Going International
Session 18
Evolutionary Concepts

Track B: Strategy Practices in Complex Settings

Session 22
Inter-organizational Strategizing: Joint Ventures and Strategic Alliances
Session 26
Strategizing through Tools and Concepts
19:00 — 21:00
Off-Site Dinner at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum

Saturday, June 22, 2013

09:00 — 10:15
Crossroads Session: Ecosystems and Business Models

Session Chair

Richard Priem, Texas Christian University

photo of Richard Priem

Richard Priem is Professor of Strategy at the Neeley School of Business at the Texas Christian University where he holds the Luther Henderson Chair in Strategic Management and Leadership. He also is Professor of Strategy at LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome, where he holds the Terna Chair in Business Ethics. Richard Priem serves on the editorial boards of several journals including the Strategic Management Journal. He has served on the SMS Best Paper selection committee for eight years. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the University College of Belize and has been Visiting Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Bocconi University, Groupe ESCEM, and was a Distinguished Research Visiting Professor at Lingnan (University) College of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. Richard Priem has published 50 scholarly articles in academic journals such as the Strategic Management Journal. Richard has received various teaching and research awards, including the 2011 AMR “Decade” award.

Within this thought space we invite to think of the interactions that occur between these two concepts. These interactions are central to the Glasgow SMS. We invite you to look at the concepts of business models and ecosystems and contrast them from the point of view of your research expertise. Questions might include: How much traction do these concepts have in explaining the phenomena you study? Or How could one contrast inward-looking business models versus outward looking ecosystems?
Very briefly business ecosystems can be described as all that encompasses the economic community that produces goods and services of value to customers. “Over time, they coevolve their capabilities and roles, and tend to align themselves with the directions set by one or more central companies.” (Moore, 1993: 26). Conversely, one description of business models is the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value. Since the process of business model construction is part of business strategy a significant amount of work has addressed this concern. (see full session details)

10:15 — 10:45
Coffee Break
10:45 — 12:00
Plenary IV: Retheorizing the Corporation from a Practice Perspective: What do Corporations Really Do?

Co-Chairs

Loizos Heracleous, University of Warwick

photo of Loizos Heracleous

Loizos Heracleous holds a Chair in Strategy and Organization at Warwick Business School and is Associate Fellow at Said Business School and Green Templeton College at Oxford University. He earned his PhD at the University of Cambridge. His research interests revolve around organizational aspects of strategy, organizational discourse and corporate governance. He received 3 research awards from the US Academy of Management and in addition to 6 books he has published over 50 research papers in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, MIS Quarterly, Strategic Management Journal, Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies and Human Relations. He serves on the editorial boards of 5 journals, including the board of the Academy of Management Journal. Loizos Heracleous received several teaching excellence awards and is an experienced executive development practitioner with 15 years’ experience, having worked with senior executives of blue-chip organizations including Rolls Royce, IBM, Tata, Total, Credit Suisse, Bank of China, Standard Chartered Bank, Kingfisher Airlines, MAN, and Singapore Institute of Directors.

David Seidl, University of Zurich

photo of David Seidl

David Seidl is Full Professor of Organization and Management at the University of Zurich. He studied Management and Sociology in Munich, London, Witten/Herdecke and Cambridge. He earned his PhD at the University of Cambridge in 2001. He is currently Past Division Chair of the Interest Group "Strategizing Activities and Practices" at the Academy of Management, Coordinator of the EGOS Standing Working Group on "Strategizing: Activity and Practice" and a Member of the EGOS Executive Board. He also sits on several Editorial Boards including Organization Studies (Senior Editor), Journal of Management Studies, Scandinavian Journal of Management, Strategic Organization and Organization. Current research focuses on strategy as practice, corporate governance and philosophy of science, which has been published widely in leading international journals. David Seidl has (co-) produced several books, including The Cambridge Handbook of Strategy as Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2010), and several Special Issues, including a Special Issue of Human Relations (2007) on "Strategizing: The Challenges of a Practice Perspective".

Speaker

Roy Suddaby, University of Alberta

photo of Roy Suddaby

Roy Suddaby is a Professor of Strategy and Organizations at the Alberta School of Business, University of Alberta, where he holds the Eldon Foote Chair of Law and Society. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Uppsala, Manchester Business School and Copenhagen Business School. Roy Suddaby serves on the editorial boards of several leading management journals including the Academy of Management Review, where he is currently the Editor. His research focuses on processes of organizational, institutional and societal change and has been published in leading management journals including the Academy of Management Review, the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly and Accounting, Organizations and Society. His research has won a variety of awards including the Best Paper awards at the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly and, most recently the 2012 Grief Research Impact Award.

The primary function of the corporation is changing. Originally understood as a means of maximizing shareholder value, the corporation is now decried as a “psychopath” and encouraged to adopt a broader social purpose that attends to the interests of all stakeholders. Between these two Manichean views, however, lies an empirical reality in which the modern corporation has quietly adopted many of the core behaviors and attributes that were once attributed to the nation-state. Many of these activities are unrelated to their core economic function. For example, Fortune 500 corporations have world-class museums and art collections, and universities that engage in pure research. They have armies and police forces that are often contracted by government providers. In short, the modern corporation appears to be appropriating many of the roles and responsibilities that we once assumed to be part of the function of government. This lecture will summarize ongoing research on the “secret” life of the corporation with a view to re-theorizing the role of the corporation based on an empirical understanding of what corporations really do. (see full session details)

12:00 — 13:00
Luncheon


Strategic Management Society

Glasgow